Wyoming State Capitol

The Wyoming State Capitol is the state capitol and seat of government of the U.S. state of Wyoming. Built between 1886 and 1890, the capitol is located in Cheyenne and contains the chambers of the Wyoming State Legislature as well as the office of the Governor of Wyoming.

In 1886, the Ninth Territorial Legislative Assembly authorized construction of the State Capitol. The architecture of the building is renaissance revival, reminiscent of the National Capitol Building in Washington, D.C. The sandstone for the building came from quarries in Rawlins, Wyoming and Fort Collins, Colorado. The building’s cornerstone was laid on May 18, 1887, with maps, a roster of territorial officers and other papers inside. During the Centennial of the Capitol in 1987, the cornerstone was removed, these documents were replaced and the cornerstone reset.

The exterior approach to the front steps of the capitol features the State Seal in granite as well as two statues. One of the statues is of  Esther Hobart Morris, who had a significant role in gaining women’s suffrage in the Wyoming Territory. The statue was sculpted by Avard Fairbanks. The Act to grant women the right to vote was passed by the First Territorial Assembly and signed by Governor John Allen Campbell on December 10, 1869. Wyoming was the first government in the world to grant women the right to vote.

The Dome of the capitol is copper and it tarnished so badly in 1900; therefore, they began using gold leaf on the exterior of the dome. The 24-carat gold leaf dome is visible from all roads entering the city. It has been gilded five times, the first in 1900 and the last in 2010. A highly skilled person is needed because, if the gold leaf is touched by fingers in handling, it will disintegrate. The peak of the dome is 146 feet high, and the base is 50 feet in diameter.

Have a great day!

© Jayden Miller Photography. All rights reserved.

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